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to the port of dunkirk. that's what we know as the evacuation of dunkirk. >> before you go any further, when did the british come across the channel into france? >> i think they must have done this, maybe even as early as 1938, or, but certainly after the war in 1939 started. they put the british army next to the french in anticipation of the germans coming. of course, by land through the low lands in belgium. so the british army was there in place. and it was really the best that they had. so the fact that they were pushed to dunkirk and forced to evacuate -- >> which is on the channel. >> is on the channel, was a tremendous blow to the british, and to the french. the british of course had to leave the continent across the channel, and the french were then crippled in defense of paris. part of the problem with the dunkirk evacuation by the british was that the left all their equipment in france. they had no time to take their guns, their tanks, their trucks. so the when the british soldiers ended up in southern england after the evacuation, they really only had uniform's on the backs. >> wh
've captured -- they captured of port royal bay in november 1861. all without any army support at all. but clearly that run of success was going to come to an end. the confederates have now figured out some ways to carry the war to the union forces itself. they built an ironclad, in arkansas. then came down all by itself to attack the union fleet and july of 1860 d. the confederates had gotten to commerce raiders in florida and alabama. they were being loose on the seas now. the union navy had captured galveston in october 1862 and confederates counterattacked on new year's day. so the momentum of the more it seemed to be reversed. and it took a while before it would swing back. >> craig, jim mentioned halleck's reluctance to involve himself. walk us through the development, the understanunderstan ding of the urgent need for joint domination. >> i was just going to say the broader question, there was no protocol, no understanding and very little experience in history of united states that would allow the navy and the army to work as partners on the singleton. we have to remember the o
in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers seem to belong the north, not the south. and it must have seemed for a time in 1862 that this combination of events, particularly the naval successes for the union, were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line changed. the father of water that lincoln boasted now flowed unvexed to the sea, became vexed all over again. so jim, let's start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of '61 and '62 and the spring of 1862. and it looked like they were going to open up the mississippi river completely in the summer of 1862. vicksburg was really the only confederate bastion still on the mississippi river, and both the sea-going fleet under, now-admiral david farrogot came up from the gulf of mexico to vicksburg and the so-called we were flotilla of river boats fought down the mississippi, capturing memphis on the way and a number of other places as well, and they com
the you invested a lot of money to a smart tv and you can use it as a slide show and there a usb port in the toshiba streamer and blu-ray player. i do not have to hook up another device becomes a multimedia center and turn your tv with high- definition in great picture quality for media experience and you are streaming directly to it and you are streaming her family photos and in this so much more than a media player. >>host: we will bring the item number of bundt www.hsn.com but if you want to shop this and other electronic items you can do that by going to www.hsn.com.true 1080 p item 198-9 810. darrell if you can check on this tv, it is brilliant. >>guest: screen is arepa what i love wirelessly the blu- ray player was invalid take all these family memories and projected on the tv because of the usb port. you have the blu-ray player hooked up to your tv and let's go back to media streaming.media streamers' we have sold it is and $80 value to turn your tv into a smart tv seem to have mukluks directly on your tv. great because instead of being monthly subscriber you pay per and the l
of warships and a base port of our future secretary? >> the hon. lady quite rightly speaks up for portsmouth which is and will continue to be an excellent home for the royal navy which is fully committed to ports and whatever decision is taken on the future of shipbuilding the navy will be a major employer in the city, not once the new carriers arrived in a few years time and i am sure my hon. friend will welcome the peninsula, twenty-five billion pound package that could create 1,000 few jobs. >> margaret beckley. >> in june of 2010 the prime minister said despite the deficit reduction plan he would only assure there was, quote, note increase in child politics. the fees stand by that? >> we are doing everything we can to tackle child poverty and it has come down. the point that we specifically did was we increased the element of the child tax credit that goes to the poorest families. >> in the wake of criminal convictions of the staff who repeatedly abused people living at hospital is it not time those who take the fees employee the staff and supervise staff are themselves held to account w
situation. the puellab tribe, the port and city of tacoma and others all had a difficult dispute going on. the end result was the second largest native american land claim settlement in u.s. history. and the deal led to tremendous economic growth for the tribe, for the port, and for the surrounding communities. senator inouye, as i said, was the chairman of the select committee on indian affairs in 1980 when the puelab tribe successfully sued to assert its claim for land around its reservation, and this land included the port of tacoma, many parts of downtown tacoma, the towns of fife and puelab. and because of his strong commitment to native american rights, the puelab trusted senator inouye to serve as an intermediary between the parties involved in the negotiations and to try to resolve this dispute. he made around a dozen trips to washington state at key moments of this negotiations. if you can imagine a senator who has to represent his state, be a leader on the appropriations committee, would spend so much time on one particular dispute. during one session at a tacoma hotel, senator
becoming a free port of entry like britain and germany. so we look back knowing the result of all of this which of course led to the emergence of the nation states with much greater powers reached is a precarious it was for a long period of time but it's also important to recognize the slave rights in terms of the civil war it was a broad state right settlement but the only state that seceded from the union were slave states and i don't think that is significant, too. there is no way of understanding secession and state rights outside of the question. >> prisoner steve, the nitze fusion proclamation committed to put an end to all the discussion and any existing remnants of slavery? >> it didn't. it was a very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration exercising his power as commander-in-chief, it is a war measure, the abolished slavery without compensation to the owners, this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gradually because they were addressing the compensation. the property, having abolished property rights, you know, and without threat
, there was some secessionist sentiment. in the midwest, there was talk about new york being a free port of entry like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is about state rights and slavery in terms of the civil war. there was a broad state right sentiment, but the only states that seceded from the union was slave states, and i don't think that's insignificant too. there's no way of understanding secession and state rights outside the slavery question. >> host: professor hahn, 1863, the emancipation proke clay mages, -- proclamation, did it put an end to any discussion and any existing remanents of slavery? >> guest: it didn't. it was a very, very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration, exercising his powers as commanders in chief, it's a war measure, abolishe
the treasury department already has called permanent and indefinite port authority to provide funding for the f.h. rae, bailout of the f.h.a. could occur without, as you know, mr. president
port for which he was unlikely around the world ambassador. the document raised eye brows at start of the journey, once it bore an expressive they stamped without suspicious. he arrived back in shanghai two years after the day that i set out with my passport, no visa, a broken down old bicycle and twenty dollars. he fulfilled the promise to continue to make a full global circle on the same motorcycle. so there you have it. a very, very small sample of the unusual people who have somehow found necessary to go around the world. very different reasons. so thank you. and any questions? [applause] >> when i heard about your book or heard about circumnavigating i think of people heading out east or west. are there any tails of people going -- tales of people going north or south? >> yes, thank you. a circumnavigation has a classic circumnavigation has one unusual element. it's the only form of time travel ever been proven to exist. as you go around east or west you gain or lose a day, right. so if you go over the poles you don't lose a day. there isn't the time travel. to honor that dist
, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british rule and sent their dreaded imitation of the inacquisition coach to the doors of citizens who dared voice su
barbarity. port emigrated, no active in human cruelty perpetrated by her most as performers can xl the work of this to the committed by her sultry. this is running an american paper. finally, the fourth reason and perhaps the most important reason why the anti-war movement spread and becomes a major force america is basically racism. a lot of americans felt like it would bautista corrupt american men had but degrading the united states all together by watering down what americans believed to be there in the sex and blood through the incorporation of mexicans. south carolina's greatest orator and intellectual, john c. calhoun, who was a firm believer in the importance in need of slavery was a very active opponent of the war with mexico busy that the mexicans did not belong in the united states. he said to my protest against the incorporation of such people ours is the government of the white man. a lot of americans felt like mexican land might be desirable, but having to take mexican people with the post a problem. it was the intellectual ministers making these critiques one of the contribut
's transit and port authority. >> good morning, welcome everyone to today's hearing, the challenges our region's public transit and housing base as a result superstorm sandy has been addressed -- tough morning. we started with a hearing on the loss of our ambassador from libya. those challenges, just had opening ceremony for senator o inouye line in state and now the devastation the northeast region -- has been a tough day but we appreciate our witnesses being here to shed some light and hopefully some commitment by our colleagues to meeting our challenges. as you all know sandy's destructive force overwhelmed the region particularly in new jersey and new york and the result is massive unprecedented damage, unprecedented but this was our second hurricane in two years and we expect extreme weather like this to become more common for our region. because we need to prepare for the next storm is not enough to spend our time today simply discussing how we restore our housing and transit infrastructure to their vulnerable free storm condition. in my view now is the time to determine what a
. few look on a map, the red sea leads to israel's southern port of ilat. from ilat israel can reach the ports of asia and africa. and once you close -- sealed off the straits, they're about a mile and a half wide, israel was effectively block kaeuded from the sea. that was an act of war under international law. it's a reason for going to war. nasser did not want the u.n. forces to be moved because he knew once they were removed, he as an egyptian would not be able to sit there and watch israeli boats pass by. he would have to blockade the straits again and that could cause a war. he sent instructions to his officers who were to meet with the heads of unef telling them we want to you move back from the border but stay in sharmelshef and stay in gaza. amir changed the orders. he wanted to regain glory he lost in the 1956 war. he changed the orders. we know this for fact. we have the protocol from the meeting. egyptians who came to the u.n. forces in sinai said we need you to turn out entirely. at the same time, amir sent egyptian paratroopers to occupy the region. once he did that --
it is in the same spot as kind of the often chept port. -- the ancient port. you know, this is always the place where the international links have been made. >> host: andrew blum, when were these undersea cables that you referred to laid? and by whom? >> guest: well, there have been telegraph cables across z the atlantic for 150 years now. the current generation which depending on how you count whether you say individual strands or cable systems, there are about eight or or ten or some say twelve of them across the atlantic. the current generation was all laid since the broadband boom in the mid '90s in the -- i think the first one was finished in '97 until about 2002 when the last one was completed, and they're owned by a few different kinds of companies. they're owned either by very large backbone companies like level three you mentioned. they're owned by consortia of telecoms, verizon joining with british telecom joining with deutsche telecom perhaps. or a couple of them now are owned by kind of boutique companies that only own cables across the atlantic. i'm thinking in particular of the ca
, it has an impact anyone who rides the rails for uses projects come from our port. i'm going to be working with this committee to rebuild transportation infrastructure to make it stronger and more resilient. in at least two cases, damaged the superfund sites. the potential releases of toxic pollution into the environment. they cannot do a thorough investigation of the storms in fact on sites throughout the region. today i'm introducing a superfund emergency response act which requires epa to perform an assessment of superfund site following any natural disaster and allows congress to appropriate emergency funding to remediate any damage. the bill will require epa to better protect on-site that are vulnerable to disaster. we've got to remember the super storm sandy in this changing climate are reluctant to your, to look at the changes in global temperature is very difficult to understand. the intensity, chairman more and more common by the opportunity in this community to make sure the northeast recovers every build just that way. all of them have taken an interest here, glad to share what
and roosevelt gave it to him and named him the first ambassador, the first irish catholic ambassador to the port of saint james to great britain and was one of the worst decisions that roosevelt had ever made but he somehow believed he could keep kennedy in check, but he couldn't. he couldn't. kennedy was to men when he talked to his children he was a cheerleader, she was on optimist -- he was an optimist in the relationship into the 20th century, she was a having made his pile of money, he was convinced that it was going to be taken from him. he was convinced that democracy and capitalism would be taken from the united states. if the end united states entered the war, entered world war ii on behalf of the british. nothing was more important to him than making sure that there was no war and then keeping the united states out of the war and he did everything he possibly could. he violated critical. he didn't follow orders. he met secretly with german diplomats to be that he was convinced that as a businessman, she knew how to negotiate a deal, and that if he were put into a room with hitler, the
if i can begin to speak the language of all computing devices, then i can begin to port my experience to all computing devices. and that will give the consumer dramatically more power to choose time, place and manner. you know, i love "homeland." i haven't seen sunday's episode yet. i've heard people talk about it. but i'm picking and choosing when i want to see it. i was busy last night, so i didn't watch it last night. redskins were on monday night, go skins, i much preferred to see this. but tonight, slower night, i might watch it tonight. and that's just what a dvr does for me. when you start to have the ability to command content more fully, as i think jeff's talking about, things will look a more like that. but what i will say is i don't necessarily agree with just as a tv watcher more than a policy analyst, i think people still love discovery. i don't mean just the channel, i mean the ability to find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that i don't think you could have ever imagined choosing. okay? if
, and at the time we had built seven year basis and a port as well to effort ine the u.s.  the war and also many american soldiers went to bangkok and of time, so in terms of direct support and more peripheral support, thailand was close ally and an important part of the effort. >> did they have soldiers, did that country have soldiers in vietnam? >> absolutely, and that's what  concentrate on in the book. they sent 47,000 soldiers, have for combat and the others were to fight in south viet nam as allies to the united states and the the air unit. definitely combat units fighting hillside the province working with working with the south vietnamese and other allies, the filipinos, south koreans. >> what about casualties? casualties 500 died in south viet nam whil fighting what recall the the south, and i think it is an important detail to focus on because those who don't know the history of the involvement
back and relax the one colleague successfully talked him into it. port and uneducated he had social inferiority. with a formidable knowledge of the industry or the astonishing success. he had a flair for the dramatic and he possessed a natural ability to hold an audience's attention. this the you would keep things short made him a popular speaker. as he climbed the carpeted stairs chatting with friends and colleagues, part of his speech was already written out to and in his pocket. anyone who read the paper or knew anything but to lunch or dying at the restaurant were for those who aspired to notoriety. the most manchuria's restaurant that ever existed suggested irrefutable success, socially and financially. it conveyed to the press in the public that this group of ambitious men had arrived. tireless, determined and billion endeavour's from the established the silk industry in the united states. and long-lasting national organization devoted to their cause. tonight men were celebrating the second anniversary of the silk association of america and the exhilarating truth the american
down. by the time, only a matter of eight seconds later that the next two sharper ports had cracked out everyone knew what they were now. lyndon johnson was down on the floor in the back seat of the car, curled over on his right side. the sudden large -- loud, sharp sound, the hand suddenly grabbing the shoulder and pulling in down, now he was on the floor. his face on the floor with the weight of a big man lying on top of him pressing and down, lyndon johnson would say that he would never forget his knees in my back at his elbows in my back and young blood is sitting half sitting at half lying on top of him to protect a man young blood is wearing a short wave radio to keep in communication with other cars and over this short wave radio, crackling in johnson's year, would favor saying in the first two card ahead, johnson here's he is hit, he is hit and begins to hear the word hospital. youngblood tells the driver of his car close it up because he knows his maximum protection is going to be close to that secret service, are. the driver of johnson's car is the texas highway patrolman name
was there was a coastal port, a major fortification, the allies needed to resupply their forces and needed the harbor. the only problem was there was another gun issue. like pointe du hoc it was a suicide mission. the battery, the grass battery, as many people called it, had massive battle should sized guns that were buried most of the entire fortress was buried underground, picture kind of a four story building fortress that had been buried underground. there were elevator's going down, there was an entire hospital, mess hall, everything. to the naked eye, you look across a farmer's field and all you see is a tiny little pillbox, that was the battery and for months the men of "dog company" tried to find that battery and take it. that was their objective. the guns were devastating. they fought on hill's 63 in the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an entire hedgerow, small mound of earth and barry men alive and that is exactly what happened. a fox for several weeks in this place and what is amazing is a small team of four men, known as the fabul
of the ports and knowing that deepening needs to be there, he's shown courage when he helped us in the fight against national labor relations board and the unions that tried to take boeing down. he has shown it with his fiscal representation and the fact that he knows the value of a dollar. of he understands what every family and small business goes through, and he has stayed consistent to that. it also shows for the fact that this man loves south carolina. and he is very aware that what he does and every vote he makes affects south carolina and affects our country. and so it was with that that i knew that he was the right person. i have no doubt that he will fly through 2014. i am strongly convinced that i and the entire state will be, the entire state understands that this is the right u.s. senator for our state and for our country. what i will also tell you, and it is very important to me as a minority female that congressman scott earned this seat. he earned in this seat for the person that he is. he earned this seat for the results he has shown. he earned this seat for what i know he's
out all these amazing ports sweater built- in you have an slot for you to picture camera and pitchers, 2 usb ports and usb three technology which will allow you to transfer data that a standard usb you have a thunderbolt and that is something that intel and apple developed to allow you to transfer it permission 10 times faster than usb since you can in the south at a faster rate. there's also an intel five core processor it has made it a mac daddy of laptops. >>host: allegis declined in the left again and if possible i want to keep the flex payment arrangement at the bottom of the screen for most of the airing6 c13 they allowed me 5 flex payments only for the show in the show only. you only have 20 minutes to qualify for the flex payments on the tv and 20 minutes to qualify for the flex payments on the apple macbook pro this is all final quantities for the year and also has free shipping for which we never do on our computers. and bill is right because mac is famous their videos, and in the activities and their ease of use and the other thing is that there really famous for is how t
much less from and in addition we should secure the port of two pico. if you look at this not which i've turned on its site to show the importance of the gulf of mexico, you see various that demonstrate what people wanted to take. we see if i can get this going here. so this is the initial line exit offered in negotiations. if you look here, this is the polk was hoping to take in january. so what that would've brought us an additional one third of the country of mexico into the united states than what ended up happening. unfortunately on february 19, the treaty of water that they had although. pope decides he has to accept the treaty because there's no other congressional support for the war. he thinks long and hard and right going to have to accept this treaty even though i don't like it and this was that i won't because the pop abilities congress would not grant either men or money to persecute the war and then at least new mexico and outside, california. just to conclude you're committed the antiwar movement achieve his goals? certainly not. henry clay wanted the united states out
to port. it is a half tour of the world and stops in tahiti. so who wouldn't. that's interesting and i really admire him recommend his account. a kind of dawning consciousness of human relationship is quite interesting. thank you so much. [applause] >> i did just write this name to the michelle held up committed to better achieve, brought up of hope and change. i did it because i was talking to the national review online come and interview and said why did she write this? is admit to to be an awakening, something like that? i said you bet it is. it stuns me that half of the american population completely fell for this empty mantra of hope and change. the obama administration was going to be that transcendent administration that got us all together. that is why barack obama earned the white house because he was going to be the great uniter. remember that inaugural address where he said to conservatives, i want to listen to you, especially when we disagree. he was going to meet with conservatives in congress want to wreak. he met twice. so three days after that beautiful speech, the cons
of pass pouter and ability -- pass port and ability to get the visas in the first place which is, again, why it remained decidedly a minority experience. so ease i is for symptom, but in terms -- so easy for some, but in terms of global society, not distributed to any wide extent. so i guess that would be my response. and in terms of doing the surface travel that has become the vogue, um, that's still pretty difficult. finally, i haven't talked about space very much, but that's pretty hard. only 500 people, i think as of this date, have gone into space. and not all of them really into orbit. so that's, that's a very exclusive club in temples -- in terms of around the world travel that remains the case. we'll see whether that ever changes. >> this is a very unintellectual question, but do you have a favorite character in the book, a favorite navigator? >> which would be leaving out everyone else. one person who comes to mind. because i actually wrote this book in some ways as an environmental historian looking at the human relationship to the planet, i was interested by the 20th century
of which is as the seventh uss enterprise was on her way back to port at pearl harbor. on december 7, 1941. and would later launch the first u.s. strikes of the war against japan at the marshall islands. the current uss enterprise was also on her way home on the 11th of september 2001. just over three weeks later, she would launch the first strike against al qaeda and the taliban in afghanistan. now imagine yourself a board uss enterprise on the night of those first strikes. here's part of what her captain told her crew. good evening, shipmates. the last time americans actually went to war to defend against our homeland was almost exactly 60 years ago. when our threats and her enemies conducted a surprise attack on pearl harbor. during that attack, a different enterprise was at sea on her way home. it was ultimately a response to that typical bloody task of soundly defeating her enemy. and ever since then, when america has gone to war, is to protect freedom and our vital interest, those of our allies. we have not had to defend our homeland since december 7, 1941. however, september 11 our
was the first major action the welfare rights movement campaign to stop discrimination against the port in the health-care system. the welfare mothers demanded to speak to the convention and eventually their request was granted a woman named geraldine smith who was the national rights organization financial secretary got up in front of the convention and made a blistering speech. she told the audience of hospital lobbyists the american hospital association is hypocritical, selfish, parochial and patronizing and hospitals hide behind a screen of concern for the disadvantaged while perpetuating an unequal system of health care. smith then presented the delegates with a list of demands. she told hospital officials to end the practice of dumping poor and uninsured patients and transferring them in unstable conditions, and establishing clinics where people could attend instead of going to the emergency room. she called for a requirement for all hospitals to accept medicaid patients, demanded patient representatives and members of the community especially of the 4 should have seats on hospita
the range which had begun in early november and port without cease throughout december. early-morning stillness made him contemplate of. he was independently wealthy so what was he to do now? he leaned into the window wheezing, still recovering from the ellis he had contracted out bound from south america in which captain in the minds from serving his friend stevenson. pulling aside the maudlin curtain he saw the rain had momentarily stopped and the wind had faded away. the lull was a godsend. northeast of san francisco four fifths of san francisco lander water permitting a steamer to shuttle up and down the streets and allow passengers to enter their second story city hotel room by window. the 50 inches of ice u.n. and shotgun blasts of black hail that soaked and pummeled san francisco all winter has not dispelled the fitful dreams of its citizens. they tossed in their beds inside combustible homes, heads with nightmares of what would happen when the life-saving downpour halted. they repose in front of their fighters listening to the faint clacking of sinkholes in which snake
against u.s. soil. it's israel's problem. but when you will find an atomic, makes the case with the port of san diego, it will become your problem. i do think it should be a joint effort of western society, meaning the u.s., israel, canada, australia will have only with leadership decisions in washington. >> that's not going to have been. >> the u.s. is israel's only fan. people are pretty disgusted with the kind of undemocratic behavior going on there. >> if you show me a stronger democracy in the middle east for a stronger ally of the united states in the region, i will agree with you. but i beg to differ because the cheapest aircraft today at the united states in the middle east is in that region. we are in the frontline presenting the same value in same principles. you'll find the source is coming to shores. >> thank you. >> you know, i share your concerns about iran. i worry about it all the time. i think it's real. but growing up jewish, and learned that being jewish also meant caring about the stranger from the bible or the people of king david, but also people of the profits. wha
place they were at was a place called brett. there was a coastal fort, a major port. allies needed to resupply their forces. they needed a harbor. the only problem was there was another gun position. and like pointe du hoc, it was a suicide mission. something called the locust battery. the locust battery had massive battleship sized guns that were buried mostly the entire fortress buried underground. picture a four-story building, fortress, that had been buried underground. there were elevators going down this thing. .. >> the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an spire hedge row, a small mound of earth, and bury men alive. and that's exactly what happened. they fought for several weeks many this place -- in this place x then what's amazing is a small team of four men led by lieutenant bob evland, they were known as the fabulous father. the fabulous four found a bunker and a small path that had been worn out. it looked like it had been utilized. the entire lotus battery has been surrounded by hundreds of thousands of minds and
airbases and develop a port there as well to facilitate the u.s. effort in the vietnam war and know so many american soldiers went to bangkok and spent a lot of time there. in terms of direct support and more peripheral support, thailand was a close ally and an important part of the war effort. >> to that country of soldiers in vietnam? >> absolutely. i said i concentrate on the book. thailand send 37,000 soldiers to fight in south vietnam. they also sent smaller naval units and air units. this still definitely combat units outsiders the province working with united states, the south vietnamese and other allies, filipinos and south koreans. >> what about casualties? >> 500 plus casualties -- i should say 500 died in south vietnam while fighting what we call it the viacom in the south. it's an important detail to focus on. to dismiss them with the insulting nature to use as an american mercenary paid for a lot of the military hardware and transportation logistics and extra pay the troops received and also tends to focus on black-market schemes. but the truth behind it all his soldiers were f
of ducks and geese and tradesmen trampling to ports mouth square. both sides of the square were taken up by the devil. gambling dens and thrown-together hotels and flammable canvas roofs, oil paper walls and bands who played music full blast. they were silent now. only on the fourth and upper side of the square had god taken a small toehold in a small adobe building where the reverend william taylor preached in thunder, the way of the transgress sor is hard, and that a great calamity was surely to befall the great tinderbox called san francisco. reverend taylor was rarely wrong. the building material was all combustible, all of combustibles, a citizen complained to his friends back east. no fire engines, no hook or ladders and, in fact, no water except in very deep wells. availability might be required. is it not enough to make a very prudent man tremble? this canny resident warned that fire once begun at the windward side would be certain to burn the whole of the boom town to ash in an instant. and he was right. the christmas eve fire first appeared as the light of a candle in the secon
that they don't understand, we have a big port in alabama. they took exception with that. the point is that the -- even their pucker powder is extraordinary. they are going on trade fairs. they are going on trade missions. they are aggressive about seeing where all the candy can be sold, and they're a successful example of it. there's numerous examples. the economy -- the chilan miners, the drillers that saved their lives, and how they exported their drilling rigs to the world. the reality is, i think, that the consumers around the world, people want american goods because they tend to often be the best, the most innovative, and it's our job in government to open the markets because that's good for american business, and it's good for people around the world to have access to american technology, and i think it's the job american businesses to see the opportunities and to recognize there's still a cashe to make things made in america. thanks. >> hello, so i want to talk about the other side of exportation that you mentioned, the idea of exporting ideas. >> yes. >> and my question is
.s., confiscated over 166,000 pounds of cocaine and secured over 472 vessels before they arrived at our ports. this legislation will give the coast guard the funds that it needs to upgrade equipment and purchase the right vessels for carrying out every mission that they need. this kind of work exemplifies the heroes like chief petty officer terrell horn of california. officer horn died in the line of duty last week while tracing drug smugglers off the coast of california. our thoughts are with his family and friends. his actions and service remind us of the danger that the task of the men and women of the coast guard do on a daily basis. and that's why it was so important that we pass this reauthorization bill. we couldn't have done this reauthorization without the many hours that senator begich put in to help it get across the finish line. and he knows how important the coast guard is to the men and women of the pacific northwest and to my state of washington. the coast guard is part of our maritime culture in the pacific northwest and this bill helps the coast guard watch over our people an
was the most and port milestones in the fight against al qaeda. the remover -- removal of the sole commander for 22 years is a testament to the work of countless intelligence and counterterrorism across the government and that further demonstrated as never before the extraordinary proficiency intelligence communities achieve and counterterrorism is someone who would then director for counterterrorism at the white house in the late 90s, i have to say the leaping capabilities is nothing short of astonishing. of course it was not just bin laden. we've removed more than 20 of eight q.'s top 30 leaders. now the court finds it difficult to raise money, train recruits and plant attacks outside the region. in yemen to fight against al qaeda and arabian peninsula is a work in progress, but i'm glad to see the trend lines are positive. in particular, the resolve of president hottie and begin many people have made a major difference. after holding a swath of territory at aqap has been rolled back from the gains of last year. yemen illustrates the value of the truly comprehend that approach. so while we
in economic activity. national security because we close the only port in the northeast that is a military port and always the commercial port when we need to in the case of emergencies. you know, i could go on and on. so mr. secretary, in your other role here, i want to get a sense from you as to the commitment of this administration and the federal government to help the new jersey, certainly new york as well in the region recover. because, you know, when we had hurricane katrina and the gold coast and mississippi and alabama and louisiana, i was spared. when we had tornadoes in joplin, missouri, i was there. what we have flooding along the mississippi, i was spared. when we had crop destructions in the midwest, i have been there because they believe this is the united states of america. so i fully expect that now for the first time we have the type of devastation that others have suffered and should understand that we are going to have the type of response others have received. further to get a sense, i know are working towards this goal, but a sense this administration has stories of s
only port to the northeast in new jersey that was a military port and now we use a commercial port in the case of emergencies. you know, and i could go on and on. so mr. secretary, in your other role here, i want to get a sense from you as to the commitments of this administration of the federal government to helping new jersey and certainly new york as well and the region, recovered. because you know, when we had hurricane katrina in the gulf coast in mississippi and alabama and louisiana, i was there. when we had tornadoes in joplin missouri, i was there. when we had flooding along the mississippi, i was there. when we had crop destruction in the midwest, i have been there because i believe this is the united states of america. and so i fully expect that now that for the first time we have a type of devastation that other should understand and we are going to have to type a response that others have to see. so i would like to get a sense of view as the type of commitment this administration has. >> senator, thank you for the eloquent remarks about this. as you know, this is a reg
and nobody saw that it was going to deval all the port follow owe -- the market. >> yeah. and how somebody could not see that. and second part as a female, of course, a lot has been written there would have beenless chris sis if there were more women in the financial market. >> let me answer the last one first. i mean, given what i saw until the conclusion i reached in the book, diversity helps because you have people from a multiplicity of perspectives, and you -- huh? [inaudible] i would not want to betray any prejudice by saying what women do. i think a diversity on the board elsewhere is really helpful in a lot of cases. but you can always point to counter examples. there's a woman on the risk committee of jpmorgan chase when they just took the hit $5.8 million. mark to market is really -- what we saw was that certain tools in the hands of the right managers are really good. that would apply to all derivative. in the hands of the wrong people really don't work. gold manuses mark to market, and they do it every night. goldman almost went out of business in 1994 again because of operatio
to graduate college and a port smart kid. that is telling you enormous waste of human potential. there are millions, tens of millions of young americans who could be doing great things for themselves and the rest of us who do because we have such an unequal society are being denied that chance. >> equality of opportunity where we are performing the worst of any -- >> the notion that divorce in quality results from quality of opportunity, when the results are so unequal it turns into equality of opportunity as well. >> in the joint venture with the theological seminary, taking off the first, discussing in the book, continuing that and filming-at economics.org and asking the question, an invitation to the next session. in nation of identity. question on this side. >> when i look at the last decade i see $5 trillion in debt run up by the georgia. administration. this $10 trillion seems to be a legacy with the strong involvement of fiscal pump running and yet we have a legacy of economic problems that our sovereign debt is gdp, this is the point at which at least in europe investors
people get this at home and to appreciate, and let us take the lights down to the port is almost no elimination in the studio because what i would like to do, like to put my hand in front of the screen and this is what alices seen at home. she got this for her has been carried athusband. that is what you are going to see when you get it at home and that is why when people try it, they are spoiled for all others, you probably will go to the theater again, it comes with the wi-fi adapter which is of the we have not talked about. >>guest: the 3d alice mentioned and you can watch glasses but the wi-fi adapter is included which you can't connected into the wi-fi in your home and that will allow you to really expand your entertainment and education universal will hit the internet but on the remote and you will see for a second once i do that it will load up all of the different opportunities, you go to vud orvudu app stores , [reading] 3 >>guest: different opportunities, and most of what you are seeing here is free. your family to enjoy television know what a television has been
logistics. 25,000 troops in horses and artillery to take the port of new york. >> the best thing is all the diaries talk about coming in the summer of 1776 and is two months after the declaration of independence. two months after the declaration and the siege of boston. again not trying to downplay it. whether the british were actually going to leave, there is this idea in some recent scholarship that says the americans didn't so much kick them out as the british were planning on leaving anyway. i'm not even going to go there but there is not a war on them. there is a colonial, you know, service. we declare war and we say we are independent. but yeah it would be the largest invasion since the day and all the collins note this in their diaries. the famous diarist noted coming and they can concede off staten island. sorry it sounds strange but i am walking down the street in the verrazano bridge from whatever borough ayman and i think oh wow that is where i would have seen the entire british fleet right there but the best line in the best thing that people note is they talk about the fore
and the treasury ports. the more i read, the more alarmed i became so that by the time october rolled around i was fully prepared in order to blast the gses, if you will. the speech of which most of it is there, there still a few tables missing that's been passed out to you, and you can see where my criticisms were. that speech was not particularly well received, except among the people, a lot of people in the industry who felt that absolutely. i mean, many of them thought i was right on in terms of my analysis. the fannie and freddie people, however, within the first 10 minutes were up and out of their seats and out the door, and went to one last go who was the mba president at the time and complain as to why they would allow someone like me to criticize them. what could i possibly know that would prove to be correct. for several years i was blackballed as a result of that, and the mba, took a more like five or six years before they allowed me to come back and make a presentation. in the interim, within weeks, the research that i've been doing and selling to the industry, i got cut off by bot
passed the point rate cut of come back to port. he does another halfway tour of the world and to stop said he. who wouldn't. so that is interesting, and admire him and i recommend his accounts. a really wonderful writer. again, i kind of dawning consciousness of human relationships the planet that is quite interesting. thank you so much. [applause] >> book tv is on facebook. like us to interact with guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> brigham young pioneer profit is the name of the book. george mason university professor john turner is the author of. we are here on location at george mason university. professor, who was byrd and young? >> must simply he was the second president of the church of jesus christ of latter-day saints, successor to justice met. also the first governor of the utah territory and the man who led the mormons across the country of the mountains to their new home in the west. >> out did he become more well known today than joseph smith? >> a little longer. he led the church for over 30 years. he settle
in port cities, that will offer the answer to chinese people's yearnings for freedom. in that sense, everything chambers wrote about communism and its failures is quite applicable, i think. the tougher question, or a tougher question, is the relevance of what he wrote to our struggle today with islamism. here, the other side relies on faith, and our side, especially in europe, seems to rely on materialism. this was a struggle of the human soul, chambers wrote, but we often seem to believe that the answer to islamism is simply more employment opportunities for saudi youth. we're, this a sense, in a position that we criticize the chinese leadership for having, but even here on the islamic question, chambers had interesting things to say. he wrote, quote, "the difference between liberalism and communism was in degree only." this question arose in the previous panel. continuing" they put faith in man rather than god and shared a common world view." there is a lesson here. chambers held we could not fight communism, bask with its near relation, liberalism. if 4e were alive, i think he wo
that when there is public porting of harpies teachers, students and angiograms, the overall number of procedures went down by 14% and there was no difference in patient outcomes. big study about four weeks after the book came out showing that public reporting reduces waste and has no impact. patients do just as well. so increasingly, we are learning that the impact of public reporting. all of us know doctors who should not be practicing. when national conference i was at, how many of you know that that tradition be practicing because they're too dangerous? everson o'hanlon. and because we all recognize there's going to be some bad apples that will really respond to financial incentives and that there's little accountability in general in health care hospital seven miles down the street from my hospital had a.to put in at least 500 unnecessary hurt since. now if those procedures would've been recorded in giving to the patient on a thumb drive as the advocate in the book, "unaccountable." he wouldn't have gotten way with giving students an arteries that were bought. it would've been
agents and make it impossible to drive north without going to the border patrol agent check ports with dogs. nothing stops the flow of cubans going north. for years i walked mountains, the mountains and have taken note of your and try to differentiate between the mountain lion skat and the wildcat mines along the trail with a detailed and drilling down the hill. i think of all of the souls that what the mountains at night and the ones that scratched the hole in the mountain hoping to make small fortunes. some did but most did not and most of them died early. all this heavy-metal might be easier to forget if i hadn't heard heard the rumors that they would reopen the mine which would effectively alter the economic and cultural landscape of the town. this makes me realize i have a lot to learn about how the mining companies attacked the town and surplus proximity to their operations. one afternoon as we stand on the back porch my wife and i talk about the long-term. we were wondering if raising our kids in this town is a good idea and even of the mind doesn't reopen the next few year
'll certainly remember reprovided a lot of flexibility to do smart thicks in terms rebuilding a port in a way that was smarter than there was before. so first and fore most, we have to find ways not at the federal level to stand in the way of the smart decisions, but encourage them. with whatever money we have, that's going allow the money go farther and to be smarter. second, we will, and you will see when we provide our supplement request for the administration this week with, we propose to invest in mitigation. we know now from studies fema and elsewhere that for about dollar we invest in mid gracious. we get $4 back in avoided cost over time. that's something we have to recognize as we go in. and so the federal government investing in these recognizing the fiscal limit we have but investing in a smart way, making a specific part of this proposal in each of the yours that we go forward focused on mitigation is going to be important. the third i would say i hope part of the president asked you to do this. i worked in the private sector in new york and new jersey. one of the things i know th
experience about how port and insurance business situations? >> absolutely. we've have prepared it this packet were talk about insurance being key. we do make loans for insured or underinsured losses. we'll take an salmon of the insurance policy. there's a lot of lessons learned here, but i don't want to state a specific percentage about nonfactual numbers. we can get that number. >> please. the 108 mendes features you'd be interested is your determination as to how many have insurance at how many different. i'm assuming you would agree that's critical of the amount of insurance they have when people look to the federal government to step in and fill a gap. >> just to clarify that's part of our process. we'll make a loan for $1 in the theater $50,000 of insurance. we will miquelon upfront and reduce the full amount by about 50,000 will make the phone for underinsured losses. >> we also take an assignment on insurance prayers these quakes >> we do when they make it before the insurance is settled. >> that's enough for this round. >> thank you on the senator. let me assure you we
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